Atkinsons Oud Save The King Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml

£9.9
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Atkinsons Oud Save The King Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml

Atkinsons Oud Save The King Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml

RRP: £99
Price: £9.9
£9.9 FREE Shipping

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Description

Update: Side-by-side comparison with Kalemat for those who are going to blind buy. Kalemat has prominent aoud. It’s also more syrupy sweet because of the honey and amber. Oud Save the King is powdery in comparison but it’s no powder bomb. Now that I tested side by side it’s really only the first few minutes they are similar. They develop in totally different direction. I was looking for a floral oud without rose, but Oud Save The Queen is not as floral as I expected. So the search continues. Nevertheless I love this scent, it would be perfect for autumn and winter. Atkinsons Oud Save the King Eau de Parfum was launched on their 200th anniversary. It’s a masculine perfume and its name has been inspired by the forbidden love story between Crown Prince Mohammed Ali Ibrahim of Egypt and the American movie star Mabel Normand.

Oud Save The King opens with the aroma of Mabel Normand’s favourite tea, Earl Grey, with its distinctive bergamot sweet crispness. This flows into a woody heart of creamy sandalwood with it’s oriental balsamic undertones lifted by the animalic exotic warmth of oud creating a distinctive fragrance with unforgetable exotic roots only strengthene dby the base or creamy royal iris and suave leather suede accord. After an hour this scent is pure vanilla on me. The oud, at first a quite nice but toned-down note, has vanished completely and vanilla (a cookie-like one) has made no prisoners in that fight. Atkinsons Oud Save The King is a gloriously sensuous and luxurious fragrance. Celebrating his affection for all things British and love for Mabel, it blends the distinctive aroma of her favourite tea, Earl Grey, with the rich, leathery tones of Suede accord. But, at the end of the day, he is an Egyptian prince, after all, and there’s no getting away from his exotic roots, hence the sensuous, alluring hints of sandalwood and musky Oud that make for a sophisticated, majestic fragrance fit for a king. Or even a crown prince.Even though I was specifically looking for something without rose, one day I sampled this after using Lush Rose Jam shower gel and the combination was marvelous. Oud save the king performed very well as expected and has altogether less silage than 24 but still very good longevity, dying down and becoming more manageable. Perfectly unisex. For once my skin didn’t amplify the woody notes unlike with Kalemat and Aoud Vanille. Those two I find to be more masculine leaning. I’m so tempted to get full bottle. Atkinsons Oud Save The King Eau de Parfum is a luxuriously sensual animalic fragrance for men inspired by the forbidden love story between Crown Prince Mohammed Ali Ibrahim of Egypt and the American movie star Mabel Normand; created as part of Atkinsons 200th Anniversary celebrations. For 2 years today, this scent has been one of my three most favourite scents. I have about 30-40 scents that I love a lot and use semi-often, but Oud Save the Queen I use at least once a week just like the other 2 of 3 of the most favourites.

For light intensity: spray in a cloud around your head and shoulders, let the fragrance fall gently around you. A unisex scent if you are a fella who has a sweet tooth. There is something about the scent that reminds me of my Grans favourite coconut teacake sweets. A very British thing so sorry the rest of the world. First, the name. Oud Save the King. It's TERRIBLE. Okay, Atkinsons is an English brand, and our national anthem is God Save the King/God Save the Queen (according to the reigning monarch of the time), and there are two lines in this fragrance range (Oud Save the King for men, Oud Save the Queen for women). But simply replacing the word "God" with "Oud" does not create a pun or a witticism; it's got nothing to do with anything, and it seems contrived and naff to my ears at least. Oud Save the King is a powerful fragrance on me, mainly powdery, with soft, delicate suede and oud, nothing to fear here, a strong Earl grey tea and bergamot note. It feels very creamy and buttery from the orris root and sandalwood and very resinsous in the deep dry down. Such a cozy and comforting scent…. An interesting combo of notes I have not seen before for sure! This remind me a bit of Kalemat and a penhaligon’s perfume (either Constantinople or Babylon). I also get the similarity with Mancera Aoud Vanille. Just take out the cardamom and tamped down the Aoud and it would be Oud Save the King. To me this is predominantly creamy sandalwood not aoud. The aoud here is sweet and not barnyard-y at all. I swear I can smell a hint of saffron but it’s not listed in the notes so it must be something else. Also, it’s very strange because after an hour I get Xerjoff Lira vibes. It’s that combination of citrus and vanilla custard. Xerjoff Bouquet Ideale is listed in ‘this perfume reminds me of’ section not Lira so I’m really doubting my nose right now.

Fragrance Facts

Basically, the gist I'm getting at is this fragrance has more oud and sandalwood and less vanilla as it settles. This is first and foremost a resinous, coconut dream. The coconut must arise from a mix of certain notes in this. I wonder what the accord notes are?

Sweet, coconutty with a good dash of oud. The oud doesn't dominate like many scents but you know it's there. If you usually run away from anything oudy then this is a safe bet. A very easy to love scent for those who dont want to smell girly nd like every other woman on the high st. Oud Save The Queen opens with the aroma of Mabel Normand’s favourite tea, Earl Grey, with its distinctive bergamot sweet crispness. This flows into a sweet creamy resinous woody heart guaiacwood with it’s oriental balsamic undertones lifted by the animalic exotic warmth of oud creating a distinctive fragrance with unforgetable exotic roots. The base and dry down of jasmine and orange blossom create a soft creamy sensual caress to warm the soul and mesmerise the senses. Atkinsons 1799 Fragrances. Every flask contains over 200 years of gloriously fragrant Atkinsons history that started with a young Englishman accompanied by a bear, a handful of recipes and a dream of success. This is a touch more refined than 24 Gold in truth, and so it should be for the price. It doesn't cloy so much in the opening and is less Full blooded when you try them together. The drydown is more woody and the Oud save the king has a sandalwood throughout which 24 does too but this smells a little better quality to my nose. (again for the price it ought to be) The oud in this is very noticeable with its characteristic sharpness, but it's not too challenging even if you're not a huge fan of oud. It's a clean and woody kind and it's balanced with sweeter and softer notes.The top notes are made of the British iconic Earl Grey Tea and Bergamot. The heart notes are Suede and Iris with the underlining base notes of Agarwood (Oud) and Sandalwood. Suede and Oud are the predominant notes and the scent is very long lasting. The fragrance blends Oriental exotics together with British Posh. My first impression when smelling at the spray nozzle was great. I noticed right away that this is a sweet and "friendly" oud, if oud at all.

Took me all of about 10 seconds to realize where I had smelled this one before...Scent story 24 Gold! It’s a strong scent and quite a sweet one overall, but very linear. Even though most of the people voting here considers this a more masculine scent, I find it quite feminine and I would love to wear it. This fragrance has that something that makes it special. It definitely appeals to both men and women. The sweetness offers some femininity, while the underlying dark notes add some masculinity. For me, it's the perfect balance. I actually have this scent DNA from a different brand. Anyway, enough with the visuals, what about the scent? It's TERRIFIC. It's unlike pretty much any fragrance I've ever encountered, and certainly very different from the mass brands. It opens with notes of Earl Grey tea and a smooth bergamot, but rather than being sharp and citrussy, those two top notes are wrapped around a sultry, leathery/smoky centre which is immediately apparent. There's citriol and leather (specified as "suede" in the official scent notes from Atkinsons) blended with cedarwood, gurjun balm and guiac wood. There is, as far as I can tell, no oud in Oud Save the King, which makes the name even more baffling. Despite that, it's a gorgeous, very classy fragrance, sultry and sinuous, with plenty of projection power. It's fairly linear throughout its life and doesn't descend into powderiness in the dry down. The overall effect is of a warm, sensuous, slightly smoky dark woody scent with unusual hints of lime, but a smooth, silky lime rather than a sharp hit of citrus. Hard to describe, wonderful to experience. Then, when I sprayed it onto my skin and wore the scent for an hour or so it became so cloyingly sweet that I was heavily wondering why on earth at first I was so taken by OSTK.So there you have it. Is OSTK for everyone? Of course not and the price can be on the expensive side for some. But if you do come across it please sample it at least you wont regret it. Atkinsons Oud Save The Queen Eau de Parfum is a luxuriously sensual animalic fragrance for women inspired by the 1920’s tragic love story between Crown Prince Mohammed Ali Ibrahim of Egypt and the American movie star Mabel Normand; created as part of Atkinsons 200th Anniversary celebrations. A bizarre and complex mixture of fruity top notes, orris root hint of cinnamon, then loads of amber, vanilla, and an unmistakable but utterly lost Oud accord. His fame spread abroad and before long his clientele featured names as august and regal as Prince Tomasi di Lampedusa, the Tsarina of Russia, Queen Margherita of Savoia, Lady Hamilton and that dandiest of all dandies, Beau Brummel. Even arch-enemies Napoleon and the Duke of Wellington were fragrantly united in their appreciation of Atkinsons’ divine colognes. And if that weren’t enough, the final seal of sweet-smelling success came in 1826 when King George IV chanced upon the brand and was immediately intoxicated. Love at first whiff, one might say. In fact, he went so far as to proclaim Atkinsons the Official Perfumer to the Royal Court of England and the rest, as they say, is history.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

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