Clementoni 61730 Action & Reaction Chaos Effect-Track Set-Marble Run-Construction Toys for Kids from 8 Years and Older-Made in Italy, (English Version), Multi-Coloured

£13.495
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Clementoni 61730 Action & Reaction Chaos Effect-Track Set-Marble Run-Construction Toys for Kids from 8 Years and Older-Made in Italy, (English Version), Multi-Coloured

Clementoni 61730 Action & Reaction Chaos Effect-Track Set-Marble Run-Construction Toys for Kids from 8 Years and Older-Made in Italy, (English Version), Multi-Coloured

RRP: £26.99
Price: £13.495
£13.495 FREE Shipping

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Description

Compare that to this three-second shot from 2011's "Columbiana," where you see the camera cut 11 times. Andy: And a lot of those moves, a lot of those sweeping groundwork floor techniques, they don't exist in martial arts. Yeah.

Timothy: There is an aesthetic beauty and dance-like quality to the fight sequences that you see in Hong Kong actions. Narrator: The fights in "Everything Everywhere" bent the rules of human movement and action in general.

Account icon An icon in the shape of a person's head and shoulders. It often indicates a user profile. Everything Everywhere" drew inspiration from classic martial-arts movies, which routinely showcase fights with fewer cuts and camera moves compared to modern Hollywood action movies. We talked to the film's stunt coordinator and fight choreographers to find out how they pulled off some of the movie's most memorable fight scenes.

Narrator: This use of random objects may look scrappy, but it actually involves super-detailed choreography. Nailing it all took extensive previsualization, where the Le brothers recorded themselves doing different beats of the fight, then marked through all of the movements with Michelle. You might be noticing a theme here: characters making weapons out of haphazard objects in the environment, from IRS trophies to computer keyboards. Narrator: Wires were pivotal in the trophy fight, which was full of extreme motions, like this leap through the air.Break dancing, like, B-boying, you got a lot of sweeping techniques that you can't find in any martial arts. The directors of "Everything Everywhere" followed that model, as they wanted audience members to see it was actually the actors fighting in most of the scenes. They didn't want to have to shake the camera a lot or point away from the actors' faces to sell the fight. Timothy: It's a great example of that juxtaposition of a seemingly powerless body part, your pinky, blasting people into these just crazy reactions. And we used wires for all of the reactions to that to get this very dynamic reaction out of it. Narrator: In this three-second shot from "Everything Everywhere All at Once," Ke Huy Quan pulls off five distinct moves with zero cuts. Narrator: Wirework, or "wire-fu," has long been a signature of kung fu movies, with OG Hong Kong films using wires so thin they were invisible on-screen, even if they sometimes broke.

That was Brian Le, who, with his brother, Andy, choreographed the fights in the film and actually appeared in several of them. Narrator: Another moment that needed wire support: this wide shot where Michelle extracts butt plugs from both of the Le brothers in slo-mo. Andy is getting pulled by a wire, while Brian's suspended up top holding a plank position.Executing these core kung fu moves perfectly was just half the work on "Everything Everywhere." The team also had to put their own spin on the choreography. Literally, as you can see in these moves Andy did while doubling for Ke. Timothy: We were able to get this visual of her floating doing a flying knee down the stairwell towards Michelle. Brian: The part where I jump through and I'm sailing through the air in slow motion, it's to emphasize the airtime and to emphasize the beauty of it.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
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