The Dark Between The Trees

£7.995
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The Dark Between The Trees

The Dark Between The Trees

RRP: £15.99
Price: £7.995
£7.995 FREE Shipping

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What kind of research did you complete for the story? Did you get to do any interesting interviews? Make any special trips to the setting?

Just two chapters in, but wanted to leave a review because it's the first book I read on here. Characters are believable and I lready feel like I know them so can't wait to find out what happens to them. Feel sorry for the dad, the kids are great, Sosa is going to be something interesting I think. Nor sure about mum. Love the old woman, clearly crazy. I think I'm already bothered if tyere going to start getting killed. No sign of graphic violence yet, so this isn't going to be a slaughterfest, at least not yet Must get dark at somepoint. A small group of Parliamentarian soldiers are ambushed in an isolated part of Northern England. Their only hope for survival is to flee into the nearby Moresby Wood... unwise though that may seem. For Moresby Wood is known to be an unnatural place, the realm of witchcraft and shadows, where the devil is said to go walking by moonlight... This book reminds me most of Adam Neville’s The Ritual, not least because it’s taken up with the very human squabbles that take place between the desperate. Unlike The Ritual it doesn’t stop midway through to introduce a new, slightly stupider plot thrust. It’s spacious and descriptive while still being narratively tight and frightening. The twist about the nature of the wood was fascinating; a little telegraphed, I will admit, but done well enough that I didn’t mind. The 1643 POV gave me the same sort of terrible hopeless optimism laced with unflinching reality that The Terror did so well, minus all the unnecessary descriptions of steamship anatomy. What drew you to writing in this specific genre? Do you have any tips or advice for authors who want to write a thriller? I really was impressed with the history aspects throughout the book as it showed and piqued my interest that the author has good knowledge on the facts, another huge plus as I am a huge history fanToday, five women are headed into Moresby Wood to discover, once and for all, what happened to that unfortunate group of soldiers. Led by Dr Alice Christopher, an historian who has devoted her entire academic career to uncovering the secrets of Moresby Wood. Armed with metal detectors, GPS units, mobile phones and the most recent map of the area (which is nearly 50 years old), Dr Christopher’s group enters the wood ready for anything. Or so they think. The monster isn't constantly in your face, which I love. It has limited "screen time" and most of what it does happens outside the characters' view The only areas I felt could be better were, first, the way the Moresbys spoke: English until the 15th century was quite different of how it is now, or even when Shakespeare wrote. And it was certainly nothing like the written language we read frequently. However, for the sake of modern readers, it is an understandable adjustment, although it could have been incorporated better. Even an inclusion of medieval French could fit, since French was at that time one of the most popular languages in Europe. Second, some of the sentences, conjoined by commas, felt a tad bit long. We've already nearly killed one character and one has just died, and I'm kinda rooting for the one who is still alive, even though he was a pain.

Today, five women are headed into Moresby Wood to discover, once and for all, what happened to that unfortunate group of soldiers. Led by Dr Alice Christopher, an historian who has devoted her entire academic career to uncovering the secrets of Moresby Wood. Armed with metal detectors, GPS units, mobile phones and the most recent map of the area (which is nearly 50 years old), Dr Christopher's group enters the wood ready for anything. All three elements contain themes of conflict and otherness. The Moresbys, who gave their name to the wood, seek to set themselves apart from the rest of their community and move off to the forest, the Civil War soldiers are, obviously, involved in a war of division and the 'others' here could be seen as either the Papists/Catholics or the ones who either believe or don't believe the superstitions. The 21st century theme is one of academic infighting and division and it's so well done you'd have to wonder if the author has come through similar experiences! The very end of the book even left me quite impressed as I found it quite a gutsy move to wrap things up the way that Barnett did. To me it fit within the whole theme and vibe of the story but to others it may seem completely different if not downright contentious! I’m actually looking forward to more people reading this so that I can discuss it with someone! I absolutely loved the group of women who make up the "present " day group as they seek to discover the truth surrounding the legends of these woods and what has happened to the soldiers from the "past" that wandered in after an ambush.I have grown up reading Satyajit Ray’s various horror stories, and reading Chander Pahar (Mountain of the Moon) by Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay every few months. I have loved, since I was able to read, the thrill and rush of reading horror and adventure. This book reminded me of these works, after quite a long time. This was especially because both Chander Pahar and this novel take place in the forest, with the same sense of disorientation, doubt, an unknown but legendary animal chasing and killing comrades, and finally, the cave. It didn’t feel borrowed, but like two stones is the same alley. This book had managed to scare me off from late night reading, that’s how good it is. And it is honestly an honour to read it in May, because I know when it comes out during the Halloween season, it will fit right in. Barnett employs one of the story telling devices I enjoy the most which is unfolding parallel plots, one in the past and one in the present. Your story is written with a dual timeline and POVs. What do you think is the appeal to readers and the advantages to authors with writing a book this way? Looks well written so far. New writer, but I'm hopeful this looks well put together. Leaving a review to encourage to go the distance and make sure the rest get's posted. so far so good, keep it coming. I love the way these two storylines always complement each other, as well as how one can foreshadow what might happen to the other or alternatively become a red herring rather so that you never quite know what to expect.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
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